How to Become a Nurse in North Dakota

The North Dakota Board of Nursing provides regulation and guidance for nursing professionals working in the state. The board also grants licensure for registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). Certified nurse aides (CNAs) are registered by the Division of Health Facilities.

The North Dakota Center for Nursing has indicated that North Dakota is suffering from a nurse staffing shortage. The population of the state is also expected to grow over the next several years, which means that the need for nurses will likewise increase. For these reasons, there has never been a better time to enroll in one of the nursing schools in North Dakota.

How to Get Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) Certification in North Dakota

In North Dakota, CNAs are known as certified nurse aides. These medical professionals are registered by the North Dakota Department of Health’s Division of Health Facilities, which operates under the purview of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This government agency has approved 57 different nurse aide training programs that prepare prospective nurse aides with the education they need to become a CNA in North Dakota.

A candidate can be registered as a CNA in North Dakota after completing an approved CNA training program and passing the CNA competency exam. CNAs from other states can also be recognized by endorsement. However, a reciprocal CNA registration is not guaranteed. Candidates must submit their applications online or directly via e-mail, fax, or mail. They are also required to disclose personally identifying information, such as any previous criminal charges, disciplinary incidents within the nursing field and work history. Applicants must also identify the states in which they are registered to work as CNAs (if applicable). When this information has been evaluated by the North Dakota Department of Health, applicants may be granted equivalent licensure.

CNA registration expires after two years and must be renewed like any other North Dakota nursing license. Candidates will be reminded to renew via mail approximately two months before the date of expiration. There is currently no fee to renew a certified nurse aide registration.

How to Get a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) License in North Dakota

There are more than 3,000 LPNs working in the state of North Dakota. To join their ranks, an aspiring LPN has two options. The first is to pursue licensure by examination. In order to qualify for this type of North Dakota nursing license, candidates must first graduate from an approved nursing program and must be able to provide official transcripts to the nursing board. The next step is to register for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-PN). Once their application is approved by the board, the candidate can take the NCLEX-PN exam. Upon receiving a passing score on this test, candidates will be issued an LPN license. The application fee is $130.

Nurses licensed in another state can also obtain a North Dakota LPN license by endorsement. This process requires candidates to first complete a nursing education program and acquire valid out-of-state licensure. If their education was not completed within the past four years, candidates for licensure by endorsement will also be required to demonstrate 400 hours of licensed nursing practice within the past four years. Before applying online, nurses will need to prepare official college transcripts and will need to verify their current licensure. The application fee is $160.

North Dakota LPN licenses expire after a period of two years. Renewal applications must be submitted directly to the nursing board. Renewing a license costs $110, and nurses must also demonstrate that they have achieved 12 contact hours of approved continuing education credits in order to qualify.

How to Get a Registered Nurse (RN) License in North Dakota

There are several ways to earn a North Dakota RN license. The most common method is to apply for licensure by examination. An application fee of $130 is required. Candidates must complete one of the state-approved nursing education programs. Official college transcripts are required to demonstrate that this requirement has been met. Next, prospective RNs will need to register for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Once their application is approved by the North Dakota Board of Nursing, prospective RNs can sit the NCLEX-RN. If they pass the exam, they will receive their RN license.

RNs who are already licensed in another state can also apply for a North Dakota nursing license under the provisions of licensure by endorsement. To be eligible, candidates must demonstrate that their nursing program included supervised clinical experience and sufficient preparation for working as an RN. Candidates must either have at least 400 hours of licensed nursing experience or they must have completed their education within the past four years. When these prerequisites are satisfied, applicants can apply for reciprocal licensure through the state’s nursing board. Applicants must provide official college transcripts and verification of current licensure, and they must pay an application fee of $160.

RNs can also practice in North Dakota if their nursing license was acquired in a state that participates in the Nurse Licensure Compact. This is a multistate program in which nurses licensed in one participating state may be permitted to practice at the same level in a second participating state.

However a North Dakota RN license is obtained, it will expire after a period of two years. Online renewal costs $120 and is available from Oct. 1 through Dec. 31 of each year. Renewal during other periods of the year must be accomplished by contacting the board directly.

How to Get an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) License in North Dakota

The North Dakota Board of Nursing recognizes several different types of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). It is possible for nurses to obtain a North Dakota nurse license to work as a nurse practitioner (NP), clinical nurse specialist (CNRS), certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) or certified nurse midwife. Each of these specializations has an examination and national certification associated with it. These exams must be completed before the state will grant APRN licensure. A nurse seeking an APRN license must also have an active North Dakota RN license.

When a prospective APRN has earned a college degree and received the relevant national certification they will become eligible for a North Dakota Advanced Practice Nurse license. However, they must also meet certain continuing education credits. For example, the board requires candidates to complete 30 hours of pharmacology study. They also need to pass a criminal background check. The application fee for an APRN license is $120. If one is seeking prescriptive authority, the total application fee will amount to $170.

APRN licenses in North Dakota must be renewed every two years. Renewal requirements for this type of licensure involve a minimum of 15 hours of education in pharmacology or pharmacotherapy. Academic courses, seminars or approved correspondence may be sufficient to meet this requirement. Depending on the type of APRN license being renewed, applicants can expect to pay between $160 and $210.